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Stony Brook Heart Institute Offers Heart Rhythm Treatment at Stony Brook Southampton Hospital

As of July, Stony Brook Heart Institute will begin to offer select electrophysiology services to treat heart rhythm disorders, also known as arrhythmias, at Stony Brook Southampton Hospital.

This new-to-Southampton service will allow people living on the East End who need a pacemaker, defibrillator, or loop recorder implantation to receive help regulating their heartbeats without having to travel far to do so. These services will complement those offered in Stony Brook Southampton Hospital’s Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, providing residents with greater access to cardiovascular diagnosis, treatment and care, close to home.

The procedures will be administered in Stony Brook Southampton’s Audrey and Martin Gruss Heart & Stroke Center, where specialists from the Stony Brook University Heart Institute Heart Rhythm Center will have the ability to identify abnormal heartbeats and then develop a personalized and minimally invasive treatment plan for patients that can be carried out in the Heart & Stroke Center’s advanced endovascular surgical suite.

“For patients and their families living on the East End of Long Island, they no longer have to travel far to get quality heart rhythm care,” said Eric J. Rashba, MD, FACC, FHRS, Director, Stony Brook Heart Rhythm Center and Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology at Stony Brook Medicine. “They now can get the same quality of care they would get at Stony Brook, by our electrophysiology experts, right on site at Stony Brook Southampton Hospital.”

Staff at Stony Brook Southampton Hospital will work closely with Dr. Rashba and his veteran team of electrophysiologists, nurse practitioners and physician assistants—including Roger Fan, MD—who offer decades of training and experience, insight from cutting-edge research, a multidisciplinary approach to care, and a patient-focused environment. Dr. Rashba is currently implanting the world’s smallest pacemaker—the wireless 1.01-inch Micra—into patients with bradycardia.

Eric Rashba, MD, Director, Heart Rhythm Center, Stony Brook Heart Institute; Rebecca Burriesci, RN; Joseph Angeloro, Interventional Technologist; and Michelle Yaeger, RN